South Boston housing projects

RenderOC12.JPGPhase Two, which will cost an estimated $80 million, is partially funded by a $22-million US Department of Housing and Urban Development grant, according to the Boston Housing Authority. The City of Boston Neighborhood Housing Trust also contributed $1-million to the project along with $3.5-million in state bond funds and low income housing tax credits from the state, according to the City of Boston.

Crews are more than half-way through the demolition portion of Phase Two, according to Darcy Jameson, development director for Beacon Communities.

In addition to erecting new townhouses and four-story elevator buildings, the project will also create new streets.

Two new roads that connect to Old Colony Avenue, Patterson Way, and Burke Street will be constructed in Phase Two. Once all the phases have been completed five new roads connecting to Columbia Road, East 8th Street, Old Colony Avenue, Patterson Way, and Burke Street will be added to the area.

A.IMG_2467.JPG“[The project] will continue to knit Old Colony back into the community, ” said Jameson. “The new streets will create new connections and open it up.”

Jameson said demolition and cleanup should be completed by February, with crews expected to begin early construction and foundation work after the demolition.

So far work has been “very smooth, ” according to Jameson, who said all construction in Phase Two is expected to be completed by the winter of 2014.

That portion of the project is currently unfunded, according to the Boston Housing Authority.


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